Ello

Archives by month/year

David Stubbs – Future Days: Krautrock and the Building of Modern Germany

Faber & Faber

David Stubbs - Future DaysBack in 1986, some real waves were made by the publication of The Audit of War, a bitter and excoriating account of Britain’s strategic socio-economic decision-making during the first ten years after World War Two. The work was written by revisionist (military) historian Correlli Barnett, who critiqued – unfavourably and controversially – the ethos that guided Britain through its immediate decade of post-war reconstruction.

Barnett’s narrative unflinchingly took apart many of the myths that the UK wrapped around itself in the aftermath of its victoryi, and which subsequently became a blindfold that prevented it from seeing itself as it truly was in the mirror and doing something about the more urgent and unattractive parts of the reflection. The book itself was a polarising affair, a real

Continue reading David Stubbs – Future Days: Krautrock and the Building of Modern Germany […]

Jeremy Reed and Karolina Urbaniak – Altered Balance: A Tribute to Coil

Infinity Land Press

Altered Balance: A Tribute to CoilJohn Balance dies and becomes a kind of saint. This is a hagiography of sorts, though it doesn’t attempt to smooth edges or unwrinkle ravages; it’s clear in these beautifully-presented pages that he was a complex, maybe difficult man. It’s also clear that he was a flame that attracted people to him, a person so out there that he was able to continually make them feel welcome. A man full of light, or spectral kindness, of deep morality. A balance.

Like many Coil fans hearing about this book, I was hooked between two poles, pulled apart by horses: on the one hand, we all want more; more insight, more detail about the processes and the paradoxes behind the

Continue reading Jeremy Reed and Karolina Urbaniak – Altered Balance: A Tribute to Coil […]

Joe Banks – Rorschach Audio: Art & Illusion for Sound

Disinformation/Strange Attractor Press

I love the dead before they rise, no farewells, no goodbyes.” Alice Cooper’s “I Love The Dead” is surely the definitive romantic ode to the dearly departed, but he was by no means the first to spend his time romanticising those now six feet under.

Nikolai Federov was one of the most radical thinkers in Russia during the Nineteenth Century. For a man who lived in the Victorian era, Federov’s brand of kooky futurism encompassed such far-out and far-forward notions as space travel, colonisation of the oceans, the perfection of the human race and immortality. But as well as being impressively visionary, he was also madder than a soup sandwich. One of his core beliefs was that in order for the human race to truly become

Continue reading Joe Banks – Rorschach Audio: Art & Illusion for Sound […]